Community Action

Community action at UUFRC occurs in many ways and through many groups. See below for  events/activities being organized by or supported in some way by the Social Action Committee.  The best way to be regularly involved in community outreach and social justice is via the Social Action Committee, which meets monthly, and communicates regularly through its own Yahoo Groups email discussion.  Examples of community action are:

  • Direct action in the community, such as our tutoring project at Roosevelt Elementary School
  • Speakers and films to educate the congregation on a variety of issues
  • Projects arising from the Children’s RE program, such as the sale of brownies to raise money for causes chosen by our young people.
  • Classes and workshops sponsored by our Adult Religious Education program

To learn more about the Social Action Committee, visit the Committee page on this site, join the UUFRC-SAC YahooGroups email list, pick up one of our brochures, or attend one of our meetings (open to all).  Next meeting of the Social Action Committee will be June 5th.  Our June meeting will be at 9 am, as the UUFRC annual meeting and Share the Plate vote will take place after the service.  Deadline to submit a nomination for Share the Plate is May 20th.

FOCUS (2015-2016):

  • Equity and Justice – Black Lives Matter, immigration, housing, human trafficking (Super Bowl)
  • Earth stewardship – climate change, water-saving landscaping redesign
  • Education – support Roosevelt School

SPECIAL EVENTS:

.APRIL 24th – Incredible Edible Todmorden presentation after the service, by founder Mary Clear.  This is a community development project in Todmorden, a market town in West Yorkshire, Englan, which organizes growing fruit, herbs and vegetables around the town that are for everyone to share. They also run a wide range of events that help strengthen the local community.  It is a model which has been catching on in many places.

MAY 15th, 12:30 pm – Screening of the Faith Against Fracking documentary and discussion.  Faith Against Fracking is an organization uniting faith leaders and religious organizations in a call to ban fracking and other extreme fossil fuel extraction methods which cause serious pollution problems and threaten the Earth’s population due to accelerating climate change.

MAY 22nd – Bike to Worship Day, including bicycle blessing, free bike repair services and other activities.  Bicycling to church (and elsewhere) promotes personal heath, reduces traffic and parking congestion, and reduces vehicular air pollution which causes respiratory illness and contributes to global warming.  Bicycling to church is also a great way to enjoy the sights, smells and sounds of spring here on our beautiful Peninsula.

LONGER TERM PROJECTS:

“Black Lives Matter/Beloved Conversations”

About 30 members of UUFRC and UU San Mateo plus a few other community members attended a Black Lives Matter discussion at UU San Mateo on Dec. 1st.  This year, about 20 of us have attended a “Beloved Conversations” workshop in Oakland and are continuing to meet twice a month to continue to learn about white privilege and how to build relationships and have conversations around race and privilege.

A Black Lives Matter banner is now displayed in front of the Fellowship, designed based on similar banners hanging at other UU churches.  The banner expresses the intention and concerns of the Social Action Committee, based on UU principles and in conjunction with the Standing on the Side of Love campaign.

Lawn Replacement:

The Climate Change class which met in January/February 2014 decided to take on a followup project, converting the grass lawns at the Fellowship into a low-water landscape. Watch the landscape as it grows and changes.  A special congratulations to Carolyn Chaney, Dick Edminster and all the others who worked on replacing the lawn with attractive, water saving alternatives including beautiful native plants, raised beds for herbs, and decorative stonework & walking paths. And a big congratulations to Carolyn Chaney for winning the Pacific Central District’s Community Service Award for her work on this project.

ONGOING ACTIVITIES:

Monthly letterwriting / petition gathering table after the service on the 2nd Sunday of the month.  This happens based on someone stepping up with an idea – we can help with supplies and setup.

Monthly collections:   We will continue collecting food for Second Harvest Food Bank throughout the year.

A collection of toiletries for Dignity on Wheels, a new program which provides laundry services and showers for the homeless from a bus, started in October and continues.  Starting this spring we may also take up a collection for bike repair to benefit homeless and low income members of our community.  We are also collecting school supplies for Roosevelt Elementary School.

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SHARE THE PLATE:

 

  • How it works: Every year, the Social Action Committee solicits nominations for non-profit organizations to which we will give one week’s Sunday collection.  Usually they are local organizations in which one or more UUFRC members is actively involved.   Donations are made about once a month.  If more than 10 organizations are nominated, the Social Action Committee prepares a ballot and there is a vote after the annual meeting to select the winners.

 

The following organizations were selected in June for FY 2015-2016:

  1. CORA (Communities Overcoming Relationship Abuse)
  2. Fool’s Mission/Faithful Fools
  3. InnVision Shelter Network: Maple Street
  4. NAMI San Mateo (mental health)
  5. Redwood City Educational Foundation (Sept. 27th)
  6. Roosevelt School Outdoor Education
  7. Sequoia High School Dream Club
  8. Village Harvest (urban fruit harvesting & donation) (OCTOBER)
  9. KARA (grief counseling)
  10. Sequoia Adult School Scholars
  11. 2 reserved for Ministers Choice:

    1. At the Christmas Eve special collection $700 was collected for the UUSC-UUA Refugee Crisis Fund; at least $50 was donated online as well

The results of 2014-2015 FY  Share the Plate were:

  • San Mateo Sheriff’s Activities League (July – $729 raised)
  • CASA – Court-Appointed Special Advocates (August – $727 raised)
  • Redwood City Educational Foundation (September – $1767 raised)
  • Fool’s Mission
  • InnVision Shelter Network (December)
  • Kara (Support for Grief and end-of-life) ($1020)
  • Music in the Schools Foundation
  • Roosevelt School Outdoor Education (February – $1691.)
  • Sequoia High School Dream Club (January – over $3700)
  • UU Service Committee (April – for water justice – $800.)
  • Minister’s Discretionary Fund (October – $903.)
  • Heath Connected (June) (www.health-connected.org)
    • The list of 2013-2014 recipients is posted here.